Last edited by Mikaran
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

4 edition of International legal protection of cultural property found in the catalog.

International legal protection of cultural property

Emil Aleksandrov

International legal protection of cultural property

by Emil Aleksandrov

  • 243 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Sofia Press in [Sofia] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cultural property -- Protection (International law)

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 156-[164]

    StatementEmil Alexandrov ; [translated by Z. Stankov].
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsK3791 .A7413
    The Physical Object
    Pagination164, [1] p. ;
    Number of Pages164
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4203609M
    LC Control Number80482769

    Pairing the inadequacies of our current international intellectual property system with potential solutions both within and outside of the realm of intellectual property, the book offers hope for greater protection of traditional knowledge, cultural heritage, and . International legal framework Cultural heritage and armed conflicts The return, restitution, and repatriation of movable cultural heritage World Heritage Convention Underwater cultural heritage Intangible cultural heritage From five international conventions to an international law of co-operation. Subject headings Cultural property--Protection.

    One means by which states seek to protect both immovable and movable cultural property is through international criminal law. A detailed corpus of war crimes exists to safeguard such property from destruction and plunder in armed conflict. ForrestCraig, International Law and the Protection of Cultural Heritage, Routledge, Pp. ISBN , $ - Volume 18 Issue 3 - Thomas Adlercreutz.

    The International Law of Property John G. Sprankling. Ground-breaking new work on the various ways international law intersects with private property; Draws on international human rights law, indigenous rights, foreign investment law, intellectual property, the law of the sea, and airspace law to identify an emerging international law of property.   traditional knowledge and intellectual property law. The most significant be-ing that intellectual property has a unique European derivation and this in-forms its modes of classification, identification and operation.2 Intellectual property law promotes particular cultural interpretations of knowledge, ownership, authorship and property.


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International legal protection of cultural property by Emil Aleksandrov Download PDF EPUB FB2

However, the book does not merely describe the conventional principles and rules, but, critically evaluates the extent to which these international law principles and rules provide an effective and coherent international law framework for the protection of cultural Cited by:   In Prosecuting the Destruction of Cultural Property in International Criminal Law Caroline Ehlert offers an analysis of treaty law protecting cultural property from destruction and foremost of the relevant provisions for prosecuting the destruction of cultural property in international criminal law.

The wanton destruction of valuable cultural property during Cited by: 7. This book explores the objects, means and ends of international cultural heritage protection.

It starts from a broad conception of cultural heritage that encompasses both tangible property, such as museum objects or buildings, and intangible heritage, such as languages and traditions.

Crossing into many disciplines, cultural property law continues to grow as an established area of practice and study.

This updated edition of Cultural Property Law provides a comprehensive, user-friendly overview of all major components of an interdisciplinary legal practice that extends from government and tribal management of land to federal underwater.

1 According to Art. 1 Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict (‘ Hague Convention on Cultural Property’) the term ‘cultural property’ is defined as[M]ovable or immovable property of great importance to the cultural heritage of every people, such as monuments of architecture, art or history, whether religious.

In international law, this term covers, irrespective of origin or ownership, movable or immovable property constituting the cultural heritage of all mankind, to which each people makes its contribution.

In view of the importance of cultural property to all peoples of the world, international law has attempted to ensure its protection in case of armed conflict. Protection Of Cultural Property Under International Humanitarian Law: Some Emerging Trends.

ISHWARA BHAT [*]. INTRODUCTION. Cultures use properties as the media of expression [1] and blossom them into proud cultural property of the community. The creative human genius, in the process, flowers into arts, architecture, sculpture, monument, painting.

His book “The administration of culture in international law” [“Die Verwaltung von Kultur im Völkerrecht”] is forthcoming with Nomos in the book series Studien zur Geschichte des Völkerrechts in Cite as: Sebastian Spitra, “The politics of cultural heritage protection in international law.

Cultural Property Is a Local, National and International Issue. Cultural property law spans state and national boundaries. Internationally, the preservation of cultural property is an important issue during times of war. Nation states must determine how to preserve cultural property between states in times of conflict.

Cultural property are physical items that are part of the cultural heritage of a group or society. They include such items as historic buildings, works of art, archaeological sites, libraries and museums.

Legal protection of cultural property comprises a number of international agreements and national laws. The world’s cultural heritage is under threat from war, illicit trafficking, social and economic upheaval, unregulated excavation and neglect.

Over a period of almost fifty years, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation has adopted five international conventions that attempt to protect this cultural heritage. This book comprehensively and Reviews: 1.

The protection of cultural property during armed conflict is based on the principle that damage to the cultural property of any people means, in the words of the Hague Convention, "damage to the By entering this website, you consent to the use of technologies, such as cookies and analytics, to customise content, advertising and provide.

The protection of cultural property in armed conflict, by which is meant its protection from damage and destruction and from all forms of misappropriation, has been a matter of legal concern since the rise of modern international law in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Rudolf Dolzer/ Erik Jayme/ Reinhard Mußgnug (editors), Rechtsfragen des internationalen Kulturgüterschutzes (Legal Problems of International Protection of Cultural Property) C.

Cultural Property Law Enforcement Coordinator Office of Legal and Victim Programs Executive Office for United States Attorneys I. Introduction Although, in the past, the United States Attorneys’ Bulletin has included individual articles relating to cultural property crime, this issue is the first that deals exclusively with this subject.

Translated by Japan Centre for International Cooperation in Conservation National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo 1 Law for the Protection of Cultural Property (Law No. ) Last Amendment: Law No. 7, Ma books, ancient documents, and other tangible cultural products are of that.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Aleksandrov, Emil, International legal protection of cultural property. [Sofia]: Sofia Press,   The intellectual property rights confer exclusive property rights in order to allow the control of the commercial exploitation of traditional cultural expressions by the creators, and establishes a moral protection of the same goods, avoiding their expropriation by third parties and preventing unfair competition.

This book provides an extensive overview of the protection of cultural heritages sites on the Moon (humanity’s lunar heritage) and the various threats they face.

First of all, the international legal. The Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict: Commentary on the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its Protocol, signed on 14 May, in the Hague, and on Other Instruments of International Law Concerning Such Protection.

Cultural Property and Identity Issues in International Law: The Inadequate Protection of the Cultural Heritage of Indigenous Peoples: /ch Indigenous peoples have historically experienced countless losses of cultural relics and material and spiritual treasures as well as destruction of theirAuthor: Athanasios Yupsanis.Published for the International Cultural Property Society International Journal of Cultural Property provides a vital, international, and multidisciplinary forum for the broad spectrum of views surrounding cultural property, cultural heritage, and related issues.

Its mission is to develop new ways of dealing with cultural property debates, to be a venue for the proposal .The most widely-accepted definition of cultural property under international law is derived from two sources: Article I of the Hague Convention and Article I of the UNESCO Convention, which read as follows: Article I - Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property In the Event of Armed Conflict (The Hague Convention).